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THE MORNING EXERCISES

CRIPPLEGATE, ST. GILES IN THE FIELDS,

IN SOUTHWARK:

DIVERS SERMONS,

PREACHED A.D. MDCLIX— MDCLXXXIX.

BY SEVERAL MINISTERS OF THE GOSPEL

IN OR NEAR LONDON.

FIFTH EDITION.

C4&EFULLY COLLATED AND COBBECTED.

WITH NOTES AND TRANSLATIONS, BY JAMES NICHOLS,

EDITOR OF FULLER'S "CHURCH HISTORY OF BRITAIN," Ac.

IN SIX VOLUMES. VOL. IV.

CONTAINING THE CONCLUSION OF THE "CONTINUATION," AND THE << CASUISTICAL MORNING EXERCISES'' AT CRIPPLEGATE :

BEIKO THE FOURTH TOLUME*

LONDON : PRINTED FOR THOMAS TEGG, 73, CHEAPSIDE.

1844.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY JAMES NIGHOUB,

H0XT0N-8QUARB.

A CONTINUATION

MOENING-EXERCISE QUESTIONS

Aim

CASES OF CONSCIENCE,

PRACTICALLY RESOLVED,

BY SUNDRY MINISTERS,

IN OCTOBER, MDCLXXXII.

But BM we were Allowed of God to be pat in tnut with the gospel, even bo we ipeak : not AM pleasing men, bnt God, which trieth onr hearts. For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloak of covetoiuness \ God is witness : oor of men sought we glory, neither of yoa> nor yet of othersi 6cc, I Thessaloniana U.

(CONCLUSION.)

CONTENTS.

A CONTINUATION OP MORNING-EXERCISE QUESTIONS.

(concluded.)

SERMON XXVI. BY THE REV. THOMAS DOOLITTLE, A.M.

or PEMBROKE HALL, CAMBRIDGE.

HOW WE SHOULD ETE ETERNITT, TUAT IT MAT HATE ITS DUE INFLUENCE UPON US IN ALL WE DO.

While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen : for the things which are seen are temporal ; but the things which are not seen are eternal 2 Corinthians iv. 18 I

XXVII. BY THE REV. MATTHEW BARKER, A.M.

OF TRINITT COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

A DISGOUJtSE OP THE RIGHT WAT OF OBTAINING AND MAINTAINING COMMUNION WITH GOD.

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with

another— 1 John i. ^ 38

XXVIII. BY THE REV. JOHN SINGLETON, A.M.

SOMETIME STUDENT OF CHRIST CHURCH, OXFODD.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAT TO PREPARE TO MEET GOD IN THE WAT OF HIS JUDGMENTS OR MERCIES?

Father, glorify thy name.— John xii. 28 ft?

▼1 CONTENTS*

SERMON XXIX. BY THE REV. MATTHEW SYLVESTER.

or ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBBIDGE.

HOW ICAT A OBACIOUS PERSON FROM WHOM GOD HIDB8 HIS FACE^ TRUST IN THE LORD AS HIS GOD?

Pftge. Why art thou cast down, O my soul ? and why art thou disquieted within me ? Hope thou in God : for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God. Psalm xlii. 11 80

XXX. BY THE REV. JOHN COLLINS, A. M.

FELLOW or HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, NEW ENGLAND. HOW THE RBUOIOUS OF A NATION ABB THE 8TBBNGTH OF IT.

But yet in it shall be a tenth, and it shaU return and shaU be eaten ; as a teil tree, and as an oak, whose substance is in them, when they cast their leaves : so the holy seed shall be the substance thereof. Isaiah vi. 13 125

XXXI. BY THE REV. THOMAS WOODCOCK, A. M.

FORKERLT FELLOW OF JE8UB COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

WHBTHBB re BB BXPBDIBNT, AND HOW THE CONOBEOATION MAY SAT "amen" in PUBUO W0B8HIF.

And Eira blessed the Lord, the great God. And aU the people answered. Amen, Amen.— Nehemiah viiL 6. 155

CONTENTS. Yii

CASUISTICAL MORNING EXERCISES. (at crippleoate.)

SERMON I. BY THE REV. SAMUEL ANNESLEY, LL.D.

HOW MAT WB GIVE CHRIST 8ATISFTIVO ACXX)UI«T, WHT WE ATTEND UFOK THE MINI8TBT OF THE WORD?

PM».

But what went ye out for to tee ?— Matthew xL 9 173

II.

BY THE REV. MATTHEW BARKER, A.M. or trikitt college, Cambridge.

WHEREIN^ AND WHEREFORE, THE DAMNATION OF TH06E THAT PERISH UNDER THE GOSPEL WILL BE MORE INTOLERABLE THAN THE DAMNATION OF SODOM, OR THE WORST OF THE HEATHENS, AT THE DAT OF JUDGMENT.

But I say unto you, That it thaU he more tolerable for the land of Sodom in the day of judgment, than for thee. Matthew zL 24 198

III. BY THE REV. RICHARD STEELE, A.M.

or ST. JOHK*S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

HOW THE UNCHARITABLE AND DANGEROUS CONTENTIONS THAT ARE AMONG FR0FEBB0R8 OF THE TRUE RELIGION, MAT BE ALLATED.

But if ye bite and devour one another, ta|ce heed that ye be not consumed one of another.— .Galatiana ▼. 16 216

nil CONTENTS.

SERMON IV.

BY THE REV. RICHARD MAYO, A.M.

FBOM WHAT FEAR OF DEATH ARE THE CHILDREN OF OOD DELITERED BY CHRIST, AND BY WHAT MEANS DOTH HE DELIVER THEM FROM IT?

Page. And deliver them who through fear of death were aU their life-time subject to

bondage. Hebrews ii. 16 253

V. BY THE REV. PETER VINKE, B.D.

80HETIME FELLOW OF PEMBROKE HALL, CAMBRIDGE. HOW IS OOSPEL-ORACE THE BEST MOTIVE TO HOLINESS?

And, Let every one that nameth the name of Christ depart from iniquity.

2 Timothy u. 19 264

VI. BY THE REV. VINCENT ALSOP, A.M.

OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

WHAT IS THAT FULNESS OF OOD EVERY TRUE CHRISTIAN OUGHT TO PRAY AND STRIVE TO BE FILLED WITH?

And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be

filled with all the fulness of God Ephesians iii. 19 285

VII. BY THE REV. RICHARD ADAMS, A.M.

FORMERLY FELLOW OF BRASEN-N08E COLLEGE, OXFORD.

now ARK THE ORDINARY MEANS OF GRACE MORE CERTAINLY SUCCESSFUL FOR CONVERSION, THAN IF PERSONS FROM HEAVEN OR HELL SHOULD TELL US WHAT IS DONE THERE?

And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will

they be persuaded, tliough one rose from the dead.—Luke xvi. 2il 31.3

CONTENTS. ix

SERMON VIII. BY THE REV. THOMAS COLE, A. M.

SOMETIME STUDEXT OF CHRIST CHURCH, AND FRIKCIPAL OF ST. HART*f

HALL, OXFORD.

now MAT IT OONVlNCnfGLT APPEAR, THAT THOSE WHO THINK IT AN EAST MATTER TO BELIEVE, ARE TET DESTITUTE OF SAVING FAITH?

And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power, which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him fWrni the dead. Ephesians i. 19, 20 332

IX. BY THE REV. EDWARD VEAL, B.D.

OP CHRIST CHURCH, OXFORD; AFTERWARDS SENIOR FELLOW OF TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN.

WHAT IS THE DANGER OF A DEATH-BED REPENTANCE?

And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.— Luke xxiii. 42 346

X. BY THE REV. THOMAS WOODCOCK, A. M.

SOMETIME FELLOW OF JESUS COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

HOW DOTH PRACTICAL GODLINESS BBITER RECTIPT THE JUDGMENT THAN DOUBTFUL DISPUTATIONS?

Him that is weak in the faith receive ye, but not to doubtful disputations.

Romans xiv. 1 309

XI. BY THE REV. WILLIAM BATES, D.D.

HOW IS SIN THE MOST FORMIDABLE EVIL?

How can I do this great wickedness, and sin against Ood ?.GeDesis xxxix. 9. 384

CONTENTS.

SERMON XII. BY THE REV. GEORGE HAMOND, A.M.

HOW MAT PRIVATE CHEI8TIAN8 BE MOST HELPFUL TO PROMOTE THE ENTER- TAINMENT OF THE GOfiPEL?

Pa«e. Walk in wisdom toward tfaem that are without...ColoMiazis iy. 5. 410

XIII. BY THE REV. NATHANAEL VINCENT, A.M.

OF CHBI8T CHURCH, OXFORD. HOW CHRIST IS TO BE FOLLOWED AS OUR EXAMPLE.

Leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps.—.! Peter ii. 21 437

XIV. BY THE REV. MATTHEW SYLVESTER,

OF ST. JOHN*S COLLEGE, CAMBBIDOE.

HOW MAT A LUKEWARM TEMPER BE EFFECTUALLY CURED IN OURSELVES, AND IN ONE ANOTHER?

And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works : not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is ; but exhorting one another : and so much the more, as ye see the day (to be) approaching..— Hebrews x. 24, 26 451

XV. BY THE REV. SAMUEL SLATER, A.M.

WHAT IS THE DUTY OF MAGIBTRATBS^ FROM THE HIGHEST TO THE LOWEST, FOR THE SUPPRE88INO OF PROFANENE88?

For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the eviL— .Romans xiii. 3 481

CONTENTS. XI

SERMON XVI.

BY THE REV. HENRY HURST, A. M.

SOMETIME FELLOW OF MEBTOX COLLEGE, OXFORD.

HOW MAT WB INQUIRE AFTER NEWS, NOT AS ATHENIANS, BUT AS CHRlBTIANSy FOR THE BETTER MANAGEMENT OF OUR PRATERS AND PRAISES FOR THE CHURCH OF GOD?

Page. For all the Athenians and strangers that were there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing. Acts xvii. 21 531

XVII. BY THE REV. DANIEL BURGESS,

OF MAGDALEN HALL, OXFORD.

WHEREIN MAT WB MORE HOPEFULLT ATTEMPT THE CONTKBSION OF TOUNGEB PEOPLE, THAN OF OTHERS?

Remember now thy CfMtor in the days of thy youth : or, as some read it, Re- member now ihy Creator in the days of thy choice. Ecdesiastes xiL 1. 650

XVIII. BY THE REV. DANIEL WILLIAMS, D.D.

WHAT KBFENTANCE OF NATIONAL SINS DOTH GOD REQUIRE, AS ETBR WB B3LPECT NATIONAL MERCIES?

Sow to yoorselYes in righteousness, reap in mercy; break up your fallow ground : for it is fllne to seek the Lord, till he come and rain righteous- ness upon you— Jlosea x. 12 M5

CONTINUATION

OF ruM

MORNING-EXERCISE QUESTIONS.

(CONCLUDED.)

SERMON XXVI.

BY THE REV. THOMAS DOOLITTLE, A.M.

OF PXMBROKB HALL, CAMBRIDGE,

HOW WE SHOULD EYE ETERNITY, THAT IT MAY HAVE ITS DUB INFLUENCE UPON US IN ALL WE DO.

While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen : for the things which are seen are temporal g but the things which are not seen are eternal. 2 Corinthians iv. 18.

Eternal! What a sound doth this word "eternal" make in my ears ! what workings doth it cause within my heart ! what casting about of thoughts ! What word is next to be added to it ? Is it, " eternal world ? " Where ? for this is temporal. 0 ! that eternal world is now by us unseen, and as to us is yet to come. But yet my trembling heart is still solicitous to what other word this word "eternal" might be prefixed as to myself, or those that hear me this day, when they and I, who, tlurough the long-sufferance of God are yet in this present and temporal, shall be in that eternal, world. Shall it be " eternal damnation" in that eternal world ? How ? after so many knockings of Christ, strivings of the Spirit, tenders of mercy, wooings of grace, calls of ministers, warnings of conscience, admonitions of friends, waitings of patience ? all which put us into a fidr probability of escaping eternal damnation. 0 dreadful words! Can more terror be contained, can more misery be comprehended, in any two words, than in " eternal damnation ? " But we in time are praying, hearing, repenting, beUeving, conflicting with devils, morti- fying sin, weaning our hearts from this world, that, when we shall go out of time, we might find " life" or " salvation" added to *' eter- nal." Eternal salvation ! these be words as comfortable as the other were terrible, as sweet as they were bitter. What, then ? Tliis word

VOL. IV. B

/y

2 8ERHON XZYI. HOW YTE SHOULD EYE ETERNITY,

'^ eternal'' is the horror of devils, the amazement of damned souls, nrhich causeth desperation in all that hellish crew ; for it woundeth like a dart, continually sticking in them, that they most certainly know that they are damned to aU eternity. Eternal ! it is the joy of angels, the delight of saints, that while they are made happy in the beatifical vision, are filled with perfect love and joy, they sit and sing, "All this will be eternal.* Eternal! this word it is a loud alarm to all that be in time ; a serious caution to make this our grand con- cern,— ^that when we must go out of time, our " eternal" souls might not be doomed down to ''eternal" damnation, but might obtain salvation that shall be "eternal;" of which we have hope and expectation, " while we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal ; but the things which are not seen are eternal." . Tlie consideration of these words may be twofold :

1 . Relative : as they are a reason of steadfastness in shaking troubles, as a cordial against fainting under the cross : '' For which cause we faint not; but though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory ; while we look," &c. (Verses 16 18.) Not only the experience of present spiritual good in the inward by the press- ing afflictions on the outward ^man, in weakening of ain, in purging away our dross, in weaning us from the world, in humbling us for our miscarriages, in reducing us from wandering, in emptying us of ■elf-conceit, in trying our faith, in exercising our patience, in confirm- ing our hope, in awakening of conscience, in biinging us tp examine our ways, in renewing our repentance, in proving our love, in quick- ening us to prayer, but also the clear and certain prospect of glory after affliction, of a "weight of glory" after "light affliction," of eternal glory after short affliction, of a weight of glory "far more exceeding" all our present sorrows, burdens, calamities, than tongue can express, or pen describe, or the mind of man conceive ; being more than " eye hath seen, or ear hath heard, or have entered into the heart of man," (1 Cor. ii. 9,) ^must needs be an alleviation of our sorrows, a lightening of our burdens, comfort in our grief, joy in our groans, strength in our weakness. Though " we are troubled on every side, yet [are we] not distressed ; though perplexed, yet not in despair ; " (2 Cor. iv. 8 ;) though under afflictions both felt and seen, yet "we faint not," while we keep our eye fixed upon the glorious things in the other world that are unseen and eternal too.

2. Abeolute : as they set before us the mark and scope [which] we should have in our eye all the while we are in time ; namely, unseen, eternal things. You stand in time ; but you should look into eter- nity : you stand tottering upon the very brink of time, and, when by death thrust out of time, you must into eternity ; and if in any case the old proverb should prevail, it should not fail in this, ^to " look before you leap." The analysis of the text breaks it into these parts:

THAT IT MAY INFLUENCS T78 IN ALL WE DO. 3

1. The objeeU that are before ue : (1.) Things seen. (2.) Things not seen.

2. The act exerted on theee obfecie, ** Looking/' expressed,

(1.) Negutwely : ** Not at the things which are seen.*' The men of the world stand gazing at these, till their eyes are dazzled with them, and their souls damned for them.

(2.) 4fi'''^*^^y - ^' ^^^ ^ ^^^ things which are not seen." Hen in this world, minding another world, stand looking at these, who have an eye to see those things that are not seen. There is a mys- tery in godliness.

3. Thepereana exerting this act upon theu obfecte. ^We that have the Spirit of God ; who have oar eyes opened ; who consider we are hasting, posting out of time into eternity. These things are set before the men of the world, who have eyes, but they do not see.

4. The property of these objecia : (1.) Things seen are temporal. (2.) Things not seen are eternal.

5. The reaeon wumng believere to keep a steadfast eye upon things unseen^ and to look (^ from things seen, is the eternal duration of the one, and the short continuance of the other : ** While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen : for,'* or ^^ because," 'Uhe things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal." The good things in this world that are seen, as riches, pleasures, honours, are things of time, and only for time ; therefore we are not much concerned whether we win or lose them ; and the bad things in this life which are seen, as poverty, imprisonment, persecution, are at longest but for a short qpace ; and therefore we are not much concerned whether we endure them, or be Areed from them. But that which addeth weight to the things in the other world now not seen by the men of this world, and draws our eyes toward them, and keeps them fixed thereon, is the eternity of them.

6. The inftuenee that . this looking upon things not seen hath upon the beholders of them, in keeping them from fainting under any affliC" turns : " While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen."

T^ree words require a little explication : ^* looking," '* temporal," •'eternal."

1. "While we look," o-xoTOUvrcoy. ^The verb is used six times in the New Testament, and is variously translated.

(1.) To take heed: ''Take heed therefore that the light which is in thee be not darkness." (Luke xi. 35.) " Have a care ; see to it." In this sense it is as if the iqpostle had said, " We take not so much heed, nor are we so full of care, about these visible, transitory things, as we are of the eternal joys of heaven, and the unseen happiness of the saints above."

(2.) To consider : " Considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted." (Gal. vL 1.) As if he had said, "We seriously consider and weigh in our minds the vanity, insufficiency, and short continu- ance of all visible things, both good and bad, whether profit or

B 2

4 SERMON XXVI. HOW WE SHOULD EYE ETERNITY,

poverty, honour or disgrace ; and the Mness, excellency, and ever- lasting nature of things unseen ; and therefore prefer these before them."

(3.) To marky observe, and take notice of: "Mark them wliich cause divisions among you." (Rom. xvi. 1 7.) " Brethren, be fol- lowers together of me, and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an ensample." (Phil. iii. 1 7.) It is the observation that believers make, that all seen things are temporal ; unseen, eternal ; which worldly men take no notice of, to influence them in what they do.

(4.) To look : ** Look not every man on his own things." (Phil, ii. 4.) "To look with a diligent eye," as the archer to the mark whereat he shoots ; " to make a thing our scope and aim : " and so the substantive is used, Phil.. iii. 14: "I press toward the mark." In this respect the sense is : " The thing that we do aim at in all we do is, to get a title to, and hereafter the possession of, eternal things ; to secure our everlasting happy state ; to have treasures, not for a while, but for ever ; to have honour and glory and joy, not in hasty time, but in abiding eternity." Believers are lowly in heart ; but they look high : the men of this world are of a haughty spirit ; but they aim at low things.

2. " Temporal : " -erpocrxaipa. Used four times in the New Testa- ment. Twice concerning temporary believers : " Yet hath he not root in himself, but dureth for a while." (Matt. xiii. 21.) "Who have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time." (Mark iv. 17.) Once concerning the pleasure of sin : " Choosing rather to suffer aflliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season." (Heb. xi. 25.) And in the text comprehensively of all visible things. Take, then, a summaiy account of all that wicked, worldly men have ; and all is " but for a while." What the richest among them have : their grandeur dureth " but for a time ; " and then is past and gone, and hath no more existence. What the mer- riest among them have, ^pleasures, mirth, .cArnal delights and joy : and this is " but for a season ; " their merry bouts will be quickly over, and then succeeds weeping and wailing for ever. What the best among them have : even their faith is " but for a time ; " and tlieir hope but for a short time ; at longest, till death shall close tlieir eyes, and then [they shall] lie down in everlasting despair : [so] that all their comings-in ^whether profits from the world, or pleasures from their sin, or supposed happiness from their supposed graces, have their goings-out ; that, upon all they have, you may write, " All is temporal." They had riches, but they are gone ; honours and plea- sures, but they are gone ; many good things in time, but, at the end of time, all have an end; and then, when their endless misery comes, this will be their doleful tune, " All our good is past and gone."

3. " Eternal," aicovta, quasi asi coy, " always existing." All dura- tion (even time itself, taken metaphysically) is nothing else but the permanency of essence. Time external, in sensu physico, is but ens rationiSf or "nothing," Therefore, according to the manner of

THAT IT MAY INFLUENCE US IN ALL WK DO. 5

beings must be the manner of their abidings. All beings may be ranlced into three sorts ; whence arise three sorts of duration :

(1.) Some things have both beginning and end : as beasts and other corruptible creatures. And their duration is time^ which hath both beginning and end.

(2.) Some things have a beginning, and no end : as angels, and the souls of men, and the state of both in the other world. And the duration by which these are measured in pliilosophy, to distinguish it from time and eternity strictly taken, is caUed evitemity ; which imports only an initial defectibility of the things in themselves* Though by the absolute power of God there might be a period put unto their being once begun, yet there is no principle of corruption in their own nature which should cause a cessation of their existing essence ; nor is it in the verge of any created power or second cause to take that being firom them, which was given to them by the First [Cause]. And these things, because they have no end, are eternal.

(3.) One only being hath tieither beginning nor end, nor can have : and that is God. And his duration is eteniityy properly and most strictly taken ; which is a duration inferring simple interminabihty of essence, all at once existing without succession. " Eternity " in the most proper acceptation doth exclude not only actual beginning and end, but all possibility of both ; and denotes indefectibihty of essence a parte ante et a parte post,* existing all at once in one continued immovable instant, without consideration of any thing in it past or to come, though it always was and will be. Plainly to every capacity might this be thus adapted : If you look backward, you cannot think of any one moment wherein God was not ; if you look forward, you cannot think of any one moment when God shall not be. For if there had been one moment when God was not, nothing could ever have been, neither God nor creature : unless that which is nothing could make itself something ; which is impossible, because working supposeth being ; and a contradiction, because it infers the being of a thing before it was ; for, in order of time or nature, the cause must be before the effect. Neither can you conceive any one moment beyond which God should cease to be ; because you cannot imagine any thing in God, or distinct from him^ that should be the cause of his ceasing to be.

The object, then, of beUevers' looking is the unseen, the eternal God, as their happiness objectively considered, which is so eternal aa to be without beginning and end ; and the enjoyment of this unseen^ eternal God in the invisible heavens, which fruition, being their happiness formally considered, hath a beginning, but no ending.

Should I follow the signification of the Greek word, as " looking at " a mark [that] we aim at, or an end which we desire to obtain, I should limit my discourse only to unseen, eternal good things ; but if it be taken in a more extended sense, " to take heed, to mark, and diligently consider," I might bring-in the unseen evils in the world to come. And, indeed, to keep our eye fixed upon invisible things, both ** Both before and hereafter." Edit.

6 8SRM0N ZZYI. HOW WX SHOULD EYK STSRNITT,

good and iMidy that make men eternally miserable or everlastingly blessed, would have a powerful inflnence upon every step we take in our daily travels to the unseen^ eternal world : to look at unseen^ eternal ml things, that we might not Ml into them : to look at nnseen, eternal good things, that we might not fall short of them. Which is the design of the question propounded from this text ; namely>

QUESTION*

How we 9hoM eye eternity, that it may have its due influence mpen in all we do, ^Which question will be more distinctly answered by resolving these following questions contained in it.

Question i. Whether there be an eternity, into which all men WMBt enter, when they yo out of time, ^That we might not only sup- pose what too many deny, and more doubt of, and some are tempted to call into question, but have it proved that no man might rationally deny the eternity of that state in the unseen world : for, upon this lies the strength of the reason in the text, why believers look at things unseen, ^because they are eternal ; and the object must be proved, before we can rationally urge the exerting of the act upon that object.

Question ii. How we should eye eternity, or look at eternal ihinge. For if they be unseen, how shall we see them ? And if they be to us in this world invisible, how shall we look at them ?

Question hi. What influence will euch a eight of and looking at eternity have upon our minde, consciences, wills, and affections in all wedo? ^

Question i. Whether there he an eternity of happiness that we s/umld look at to obtain, and of misery to escape ?

Poth any question this ? Look at men's conversations ; see their neglect of God and Christ ; their frequent, yea, constant refusals of remedying grace ; their leading a sensual, flesh-pleasing life ; their seldom thoughts of death and judgment ; their carelessness to make preparation for another world ; their minding only things temporal ; and then the question may be, *' Who do indeed believe that there is such an eternal state?'* Yet the real existence and certainty of eternal things may be evidently manifested by scripture and by arguments.

1. If you give assent to the divine authority of the scripture, you cannot deny tibe certainty of another world, nor the eternal state of souls therein, though this be now unseen to you. *' Jesus said. The children of this world marry, and are given in marriage : but they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world, and the resur- rection from the dead, neither marry, nor are given in marriage : neither can they die any more : for they are equal unto the angels." (Luke XX. 34 36.) Is not here plain mention of " this " and <' that world," and the different state in both ? In '' this," men marry and die ; in " that," they neither marry nor die ; yea, Christ hhnself afiirms, that in "that world" they cannot die. And whatsoever words the scripture borrows from the best things of this world to

THAT IT MAY INFLUENCE V8 IN ALL VfE DO. 7

help our conceptionB of the ^orious state of holy ones in the other world, some word denoting the eternal duration of it is annexed to them all. Is it called a " kingdom 7 " it is an '' everlasting king- dom." (2 Peter i. 1 1.) "A crown ? " it is '' a crown incorruptible,** (1 Cor. ix. 23,) "that fadeth not away." (1 Peter v. 4.) Is it called "glory?" it is "eternal glory.'* (Verse 10; 2 Cor. iv. 17.) "An inheritance ? " it is " incorruptible," (1 Peter i. 4,) " eternal." (Heb. ix. 15.) "A house?" it is "eternal in the heavens." (2 Cor. v. 1.) " Salvation ? " it is " eternal salvation." (Heb. v. 9.) " Life ? ** it is "eternal life." (Matt, xxv. 46.)

No less certain is the eternity of the state of the damned, by the scriptures adding some note of everlasting duration to those dreadful things by which their misery is set forth. Is it by "a furnace of Gre;' (Matt. xiii. 42,) by "a lake of fire?" (Rev. xxi. 8;) it is "fire eternal and unquenchable." (Matt, iii, 12 ; xxv, 41.) By "a prison?" (1 Peter iii. 19;) from thence is no coming forth. (Matt. V. 25, 26.) By " darkness," and " blackness of darkness ? " it ia "for ever." (Jude 13.) By "burnings?" it is "everlasting burn- ings," (Isai, xxxiii. 14.) By "torments?" (Luke xvi. 23 :) "The smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever." (Rev. xiv. 11; XX. 10.) By "damnation?" it is "eternal damnation." (Mark iii. 29.) By "destruction?" it is "everlasting destruction." (2 Thess. i. 9.) By " punishment?" it is " everlasting punishment." (Matt. xxv. 46.) By the gnawings of the worm? it is such that never dieth. (Mark ix. 44, 46, 48.) By " wrath that is to come ? " (Matt. iii. 7; 1 Thess. i. 10;) when it comes, it wilj "abide." (John iii. 36.)

Is any thing more fully and plainly asserted in the scripture^ than that the things in the other world, now unseen, are eternal things ? Those that enjoy the one in heaven, and those that now feel the other in hell, do not, cannot doubt of this ; and a little while will put all those that are now in time quite out of all doubting of the certainty of the eternity of the state in the unseen world.

2. Tlie eternity of the unseen things in heaven and hell, the everlasting happy or everlasting miserable state after this life, may be evidenced briefly, yet clearly, by these following arguments :

(1.) Gad did from eternity choose some to be fitted in time to partake of happiness to all eternity, " According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy;" (Eph. i. 4;) and, being made holy, shall be happy in obtaining that salvation to which he chose us. " God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation." (2 Thess. ii. 13.) " For God hath not appointed us to wrath, but to obtain salvation." (1 Thess, V. 9.) Which " salvation " doth include absence of all evil, and presence of all good ; and this salvation, being " eternal," (Heb. v. 9,) infers the absence of all evil /or ever, and the presence of all good /or ever ; and whosoever is delivered from all privative evils, and possessed of all positive everlasting good^ and that /or ever, cannot be denied to be happy /or ever.

8 SERMON XXVI. HOW WB SHOULD EYE ETERNITY,

(2.) Christ hath redeemed some to he infallibly brought to eternal glory, ^What reason can be given of the incarnation and death of the Son of God, if there be no eternal misery for men to be delivered from, nor any eternal happiness to be possessed of? For,

(i.) Bid Christ die to deliver his followers from poverty and prisons, from sorrow and sufferings, from trouble and tribulation ? What I and yet his holy, humble, and sincere people lie under these more than other men that are wicked and ungodly! Why was Paul, then, " in stripes and imprisonments, in hunger and thirst, in cold and nakedness, in perils and jeopardy" of his life con- tinually? (2 Cor. xi. 23 27;) and such as Pilate, Felix, and Festus in great worldly prosperity? Or can it be imagined, that men persisting in sin should be more partakers of the fruits of Christ's death, than those that forsake their sin, repent, and turn, and follow him?

(ii.) Did Christ suffer and die to purchase only temporal good things, as riches, honours, for his disciples ? Were these worth his precious blood? Whatever Christ died for, it cost him his most sacred blood. Was it, then, for temporal enjoyments only, which Turks and Pagans may and do possess more than thousands of his true and faithful followers? Did Christ intend the benefits of his death for these in more especial manner than for such as remain finally impenitent? and yet shall such reap the fruit of all his 8u£ferings, and those that believe on him go without them? Sober reason doth abhor it, and all the scripture is against it. Would Christ have humbled himself to such a contemptible birth, miserable life, lamentable, painful, shameful death, only for transitory, temporal, fading mercies? If we consider the variety of his sufferings from God, men, and devils, the dignity of the Sufferer, I profess I cannot imagine any reason of all Christ's undertakings and performances, if there be not an eternal state of misery in suffering of evil things, by his death that believers might be delivered from; and of glory in enjoying of good things, to be brought unto.

(3.) The Spirit of God doth sanctify some, that they might be ** made meet to be partakers of the " eternal " inheritance of the saints in lights (Col. i. 12.) As all are not godly, so all are not ungodly ; though most be as they were bom, yet many there be that are born again : there is a wonderful difference betwixt men and men. The Spirit of God, infrising a principle of spiritual life, and making some all over new, working in them faith in Christ, holy fear and love, patience and hope, longing desires, renewing in them the holy image of God, is as the earnest and first-fridts, assuring them in due time of a plentiful harvest of everlasting happiness. Faith is in order to eternal life and salvation; (John iii. 16;) love hath the promise of it ; (1 Cor. ii. 9 ; 2 Tim. iv. 8 ; James i. 12 ;) obedience ends in it ; (Hcb. v. 9 ;) hope waits for it ; (Kom. viii. 25 ;) and because their hope shdl never make them ashamed, (Rom. v. 5,) therefore there must be such an eternal blessed state [as] they hope for.

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(4.) The sou/s of all men are immortal, ^Though they had a beginniDg, yet [they] shall never cease to be ; therefore must^ while they be^ be in some state ; and because they be eternal, must be in some eternal state. This eternal state must be either in the soul*8 enjoyment of God, or in separation firom him ; for the wit of man cannot find out a third. For the soul, continuing to be, must be with God, or not with God ; shall enjoy him, or not enjoy him : for, to say, " He shall, and shall not," or to say, " He shall not, and yet shall," is a contradiction ; and to say, " He neither shall, nor shall not," is as bad. If, therefore, the soul be eternal, and, while it shall be, shall perfectly enjoy God, it shall be eternally happy : if it shall for ever be, and that without God, it shall be eternally miserable ; because God is the Chiefest Good, the Ultimate End and Perfection of man. The great work in this, then, is to prove that the soul \a eternal, and shall for ever be. For which I offer these things :

(i.) There is nothing within or without the soul, that can be the cause of its ceasing to be. (Here except God, who, though he can take away the being of souls and angels too, yet he hath abundantly assured us that he will not.) Nothing within it, because it is a spiritual being, and hath no internal principle, by contrary qualities, causing a cessation of its being. And because it is simple and indivisible, it is immortal and incorruptible : for that which is not compounded of parts, cannot be dissolved into parts ; and where there is no dissolution of a being, there is no corruption or end of it. There is no creature without it that can cause the soid to cease : " Fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul." (Matt. X. 28.) "Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do." (Luke xii. 4.) If they would kill the soul, they cannot ; when they have killed the body, they have done their worst, their most, their all.

(ii.) The soul of man hath not dependence upon the body, as to its being and existence, It hath certain actings and operations -which do not depend upon the body : and if the operations of the soul be independent from the body, such must the principle be from whence such operations do arise ; and if it can act without dependence on the body, then it can exist and be without the body. In the body, without dependence on the body, it hath the knowledge of imma- terial beings, as God and angels ; which were never seen by the eye of the body, nor can [be], because there must be some proportion between the object and the faculty. And the soul doth know itself; wherein it hath no need of the phantasy [fancy] ; for when it is intimately present to itself, it wanteth not the ministry of the phantasy [fancy] to its own intellection. Besides, it can conceive of nniversaJs, abstracted from its singulars ; in which it doth not depend upon the phantasy [fancy] ; for phantasmata sunt singularium, non ^niversaiium,* Therefore, since it can act in the body without dependence on the body, it can exist without the body, and not die " Fancies or imaginatioiui relate to particnlan, and not to general^."— Edit.

10 SERMON XXVI. HOW WE SHOULD EYE ETERNITY,

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when the hody doth. Which yet is more plain and certain from the